LACAC Main | Free
Wed, April 25, 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
| CAAM (California African American Museum)

The documentary film "Civic Art" delves into the world of Los Angeles-based artists as they negotiate with the government and local neighborhoods to produce ambitious, permanent, large-scale public art projects. This film highlights the vital, complicated, and often misunderstood efforts behind these artworks while exploring the extensive social power of art within four South LA County neighborhoods. The screening is followed by a conversation with Erin Harkey, former senior project manager with the LA County Arts Commission and Sara Daleiden, art and public engagement consultant and documentary producer for the Los Angeles County Arts Commission Civic Art Program’s Open Space Creative Graffiti Abatement Project. Presented in conjunction with Nicole Miller’s Athens, California.

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles was Commissioned by Los Angeles County Arts Commission Civic Art Program Open Space Graffiti Abatement Project in collaboration with Office of Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, 2nd District, County of Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recreation, County of Los Angeles Public Library. SPArt grant funding supports the film’s screening series.

LACAC Main | Free
Wed, May 23, 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
| LA County Department of Arts and Culture

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles
A film by Mark Escribano and Sara Daleiden, s(o)ul

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles, follows the rarely witnessed, intricate process of one of the most mysterious and controversial art forms affecting the public at large. This documentary delves into the requisite political journeys navigated by Los Angeles-based artists as they wrestle with myriad social sensitivities, budgetary constraints and technical variables. Attempting to stay true to their art process and aesthetic tendencies, these artists negotiate with the government and the neighborhoods to produce ambitious, permanent, large-scale art projects. With the intent to alleviate graffiti and amplify use of shared public spaces, these projects explore the extensive social power of art within four neighborhoods in South Los Angeles County.

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles was Commissioned by Los Angeles County Arts Commission Civic Art Program Open Space Graffiti Abatement Project in collaboration with Office of Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, 2nd District, County of Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recreation, County of Los Angeles Public Library. SPArt grant funding supports the film’s screening series.

LACAC Main | Free
Wed, May 2, 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
| Woodcrest Library

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles
A film by Mark Escribano and Sara Daleiden, s(o)ul

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles, follows the rarely witnessed, intricate process of one of the most mysterious and controversial art forms affecting the public at large. This documentary delves into the requisite political journeys navigated by Los Angeles-based artists as they wrestle with myriad social sensitivities, budgetary constraints and technical variables. Attempting to stay true to their art process and aesthetic tendencies, these artists negotiate with the government and the neighborhoods to produce ambitious, permanent, large-scale art projects. With the intent to alleviate graffiti and amplify use of shared public spaces, these projects explore the extensive social power of art within four neighborhoods in South Los Angeles County.

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles was Commissioned by Los Angeles County Arts Commission Civic Art Program Open Space Graffiti Abatement Project in collaboration with Office of Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, 2nd District, County of Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recreation, County of Los Angeles Public Library. SPArt grant funding supports the film’s screening series.

LACAC Main | Free
Sat, May 26, 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM
| AC Bilbrew Library

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles
A film by Mark Escribano and Sara Daleiden, s(o)ul

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles, follows the rarely witnessed, intricate process of one of the most mysterious and controversial art forms affecting the public at large. This documentary delves into the requisite political journeys navigated by Los Angeles-based artists as they wrestle with myriad social sensitivities, budgetary constraints and technical variables. Attempting to stay true to their art process and aesthetic tendencies, these artists negotiate with the government and the neighborhoods to produce ambitious, permanent, large-scale art projects. With the intent to alleviate graffiti and amplify use of shared public spaces, these projects explore the extensive social power of art within four neighborhoods in South Los Angeles County.

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles was Commissioned by Los Angeles County Arts Commission Civic Art Program Open Space Graffiti Abatement Project in collaboration with Office of Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, 2nd District, County of Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recreation, County of Los Angeles Public Library. SPArt grant funding supports the film’s screening series.

LACAC Main | Free
Sat, April 28, 7:00 PM to 9:30 PM
| Victoria Community Regional Park - Multipurpose Room

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles
A film by Mark Escribano and Sara Daleiden, s(o)ul

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles, follows the rarely witnessed, intricate process of one of the most mysterious and controversial art forms affecting the public at large. This documentary delves into the requisite political journeys navigated by Los Angeles-based artists as they wrestle with myriad social sensitivities, budgetary constraints and technical variables. Attempting to stay true to their art process and aesthetic tendencies, these artists negotiate with the government and the neighborhoods to produce ambitious, permanent, large-scale art projects. With the intent to alleviate graffiti and amplify use of shared public spaces, these projects explore the extensive social power of art within four neighborhoods in South Los Angeles County.

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles was Commissioned by Los Angeles County Arts Commission Civic Art Program Open Space Graffiti Abatement Project in collaboration with Office of Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, 2nd District, County of Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recreation, County of Los Angeles Public Library. SPArt grant funding supports the film’s screening series.

Tue, April 3, 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
| LA County Department of Arts and Culture

The Los Angeles County Arts Commission seeks an artist or artist team to design and create a large scale hanging artwork for the lobby of Zev Yaroslavsky Family Support Center. For applicants who are interested in learning more about the LACAC Civic Art program application process and the Zev Yaroslavsky Family Support Center, we will be offering a Technical Assistance Workshop.

Please note: All RSVPs must be received by Wednesday, March 28, 2018 @ 5:00PM

To RSVP, please email civicart@arts.lacounty.gov with the subject line "Zev Center TA."

Thu, March 22, 5:00 PM to 7:30 PM
| East Rancho Dominguez Community Center & Park

Some Place Chronicles is a creative placemaking project that features the people, histories and cultures of East Rancho Dominguez, Florence-Firestone, Lennox and Ladera Heights/View Park/Windsor Hills. A project of the Los Angeles County Arts Commission in partnership with the Temporary Institute of Unincorporated Studies at the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts), funded by the Office of Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas.

Civic Art: Four Stories from South Los Angeles follows the rarely witnessed, intricate process of one of the most mysterious and controversial art forms affecting the public at large. This documentary entertainingly delves into the requisite political journeys navigated by Los Angeles-based artists as they wrestle with myriad social sensitivities, budgetary constraints and technical variables. Attempting to stay true to their art process and aesthetic tendencies, these artists negotiate with the government and the neighborhoods to produce ambitious, permanent, large-scale art projects. With the intent to alleviate graffiti and amplify use of shared public spaces, these projects explore the extensive social power of art within four neighborhoods in South Los Angeles County. Civic Art highlights the vital, complicated and often misunderstood efforts behind artwork made with and for the public that often prompts questions such as: “Why is that there?”, "Who made that?” and “Am I paying for it?” The answers are both surprising and illuminating in this rare peek behind an ever-present bureaucratic curtain within a US democratic culture.

This screening of Civic Art coincides with the release of East Rancho Dominguez: I'll Make Me A World. The screening will feature good and a discussion with the artists!

LACAC Main | Free
Thu, January 25, 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
| Boyle Heights Arts Conservatory

What does cultural equity look like at the community level? How can artists and civic leaders foster creative justice for the people they serve? What the heck is a PechaKucha*? Find answers to these questions and more at The Art of Community, a night of short presentations and discussions on cultural equity in communities. Join a group of fellow artists, arts administrators and arts advocates as you listen to (and discuss) ideas from an arts educator, a museum curator, an artist and a civic hacker in a night of PechaKucha.

Featuring PechaKuchas by:

  • Mariana Astorga-Almanza, Ed.D. is the Visual and Performing Arts Coordinator in the Lynwood Unified School District. Dr. Astorga-Almanza is a National Board Certificated music educator with nine years of band and orchestra experience at the middle school level (primarily within the Los Angeles Unified School District). Dr. Astorga-Almanza earned her Bachelor of Music degree in Music Education from USC in 2006, where she marched in the USC Trojan Marching Band; a Master of Arts in Education from CSULA in 2013; and a Doctor of Education degree (Ed.D.) in the Educational Leadership Program at UCLA in 2016, where she studied the impact of California’s Local Control Funding Formula on arts education programs in two Los Angeles County school districts. Dr. Astorga-Almanza is a member of the California Practitioners Advisory Group, which provides input to the California State Board of Education related to LCFF and ESSA. She is passionate about providing all students with the equitable access to quality arts education.
  • Robert Benitez began working with the Lancaster Museum of Art & History in 2010. While on the museum’s education team, Benitez led the museum’s renowned Discovery Trunks program. In 2014, along with the acquisition of the Museum of Art & History’s community engagement space, MOAH:CEDAR, Benitez became the MOAH:CEDAR liaison. Curating exhibitions and developing programming that is accessible to both local artists and the community at large, Benitez’s vision for MOAH:CEDAR is to create a space that fosters emerging artists and reflects the community in which it serves.
  • Maceo Keeling. Maceo Paisley Keeling is a multi-disciplinary artist, designer and cultural producer who explores themes in society and identity through movement, language and imagery. After serving in the US Army and climbing the ladders of corporate America, Maceo made his way into the world of arts, entertainment and entrepreneurship. For the past decade he has danced professionally, and performed on national stages as a spoken word and performance artist. As Executive Director of Citizens of Culture, he uses the arts as a vehicle to develop critical thinking and emotional intelligence in businesses and communities. Their programs cultivate individual agency and strengthen communities. Maceo is a bronze star awardee for his service in Iraq. In 2015 he was a participant of the Millennial Trains Project. He was a NBCUniversal Challenge Grant recipient. And in 2016, he was a member of the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs exhibition SKiN. That same year, he opened Nous Tous Gallery and retail space in Chinatown, Los Angeles. He continues to work as a dancer/choreographer for the likes of indie rock sensation Beirut, Justin Timberlake and others.
  • Omar Ureta. Urban designer by day, civic hacker by night. Omar Ureta is a design technologist revealing the complexities of land use planning and development. As an urban design consultant, he advocates for architecture in support of the public realm by improving on public outreach and public process. As a civic hacker, Omar experiments with new ways to interactively communicate land-use issues through the use of open source tools and open data. He is part of an emerging community of civic hackers and leads maptimeLA, a volunteer group open to anyone interested in collaborative learning, exploration and map creation.

What the heck is a PechaKucha?

A PechaKucha is basically the antithesis of the boring Power Point lecture. It’s short, snappy and fabulous.

LACAC Main | Free
Mon, June 5, 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

Ours is a time of increased political action and civic engagement. Many arts organizations want to get involved, but believe their (c)3 status limits what they can do. A national survey of arts nonprofits found “a widespread misunderstanding … about the allowable scope of their participation in political affairs” –which prevents them – i.e. YOU -- from fully leveraging advocacy and citizen participation.

Knowledge is power, and understanding the ins and outs of nonprofit advocacy rules is key to supporting your organization to stepping in, speaking out, and facilitating change. This free afternoon session, jointly presented by California Lawyers for the Arts and the LA County Arts Commission, will dispel myths, clarify questions, and leave you ready to more fully engage in our current reality.

PRESENTERS:
Liz Bluestein, Vice President and General Counsel, Public Counsel

Cristina Pacheco, consultant, activist, and producer
Nona Randois, Southern CA Director for the Bolder Advocacy Program, Alliance for Justice

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:
Nonprofit arts leaders involved in programming and high-level decision-making for their organization. Board members welcome!

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